Sunday, 28 July 2019

Review: 'The Spacesuit' by Alison Donald and Ariel Landy

DISCLAIMER: This book was sent to me for the purposes of this review but all words and opinions are my own.

When Girl Child was little she wanted to be an astronaut. She's since had a rethink on that, which I have to admit I'm slightly relieved about - I don't doubt her ability to achieve whatever she puts her mind to, but in reality I think I'd be a nervous wreck if she was blasted off into space!

She does, however, maintain a passing interest in space, and also wants to be inventor when she grows up. I find it really encouraging that there is now more talk about the many people who worked 'behind the scenes' in the space race - the engineers, computers, coders. The work of women has been particularly highlighted in recent years, which is great for girls interested in STEM. And with this new picture book from Maverick Children's Books, we can acknowledge the work of another group of women - the seamstresses who designed and made the spacesuits used in the Apollo 11 mission 50 years ago.



'The Spacesuit' tells the story of Eleanor 'Ellie' Foraker, whose love of designing and sewing as a child led her to become a seamstress - and such a good one that she was entrusted with the responsibility of designing a spacesuit for a competition the company she worked for had entered.



It's a real against-the-odds story as Ellie's small team were up against experts in more technical fields, but with hard work and ingenuity they beat the odds and created the spacesuits that eventually went to the Moon.



I love that the story starts with Ellie as a little girl learning to sew, making it relatable for children who have dreams and passions of their own. I also really like that there are facts dotted through the story and also at the beginning and end of the book, grounding the story in reality. It's an aspect of the space race that I had never even considered before and learning about the work that went into designing the spacesuits was really interesting. While Preschooler didn't quite understand the story, Girl Child loved it and found it inspiring.

I also really like the illustrations, which capture the sixties style brilliantly and - forgive the pun - weave together aspects of tailoring and engineering beautifully. I love the facial expressions on the characters too - Ellie's expression exudes warmth and really draws you to her, and I loved the slightly cross-eyed astronaut after testing out a rival suit!!

I'd really recommend this book for older preschoolers and younger school-age children who have an interest in space, a creative streak or even just a particular passion that they dream of pursuing as they grow up. It's a really inspiring story of how small dreams can grow in unexpected ways, and how you can be part of something much bigger than yourself with hard work and determination.

Linking up with #ReadWithMe hosted by Mama Mummy Mum.

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Monday, 15 July 2019

Review: 'I, Pod' by Rebecca Lisle and Richard Watson

DISCLAIMER: I was sent a copy of this book for the purposes of this review but all words and opinions are my own.

Does anyone else find that their eldest children think they're totally capable of caring for their younger siblings despite still being tiny themselves? I remember Girl Child earnestly telling me that she could look after her little brother for me when she was only five! It's a pity we didn't have a copy of 'I, Pod' back then so I could show her how babysitting can go wrong!



'I, Pod' is the third book featuring the caveboy-inventor Pod - I reviewed the second book, the equally cleverly titled 'Game Of Stones', a while ago. This time, Pod is charged with looking after adorable cavebaby Nim. Things don't start out brilliantly when Pod tries to teach Nim to say his name, yielding some very funny results!


Pod decides to use his inventive abilities to make a swing for Nim, which she loves until disaster strikes.


Nim ends up swept down a river with Pod in hot pursuit, meeting lots of scary prehistoric creatures on the way. Parents will enjoy how Nim seems completely unfazed by the danger she's in - we all know babies and small toddlers who are totally fearless! Eventually Pod's pet mammoth saves the day, but will Pod be able to avoid getting into trouble with Nim's mum?

This is a very funny story, bound to be enjoyed by loves of the prehistoric era. It has plenty of action to keep little ones interested and the illustrations are bright, bold and fun. Look out for the little prehistoric bugs in some of the illustrations, great for spotting if your child loves minibeasts too!

Luckily Girl Child knows her capabilities a bit more now so is unlikely to offer to babysit for a while. That said, I wouldn't put it past her to invent some contraption for Preschooler to get into trouble with!

Linking up with 'Read With Me' hosted by Mama Mummy Mum and 'Kids Love To Read' hosted by Laura's Lovely, Blog, Acorn Books and BookBairn.

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Monday, 1 July 2019

Review: 'The MOOsic Makers' by Heather Pindar and Barbara Bakos

The list of things I love is a long one but fairly high up on the list you will find cows and puns. So when I received a copy of 'The MOOsic Makers' I was delighted!



Celery and Nutmeg are musical cows who love to entertain Farmer Joni. She enjoys their 'Moo-grass' tunes so much it makes the other animals a bit jealous.



But one day the roof is blown off the barn, and Farmer Joni needs to raise money to replace it. The cows turn to busking but don't get very far until Mr Smarm turns up with promises of riches. There's one hitch - they need to change their entire style to become famous.



Will they change to earn the money they need for the barn roof? Is Mr Smarm to be trusted?

I enjoyed this story - as I said, cows and puns, what's not to love? I was a little worried when Mr Smarm told the cows that Moo-grass music is for boys and they should wear pink dresses, but without wanting to spoil the ending, the cows reject his views and stay true to themselves - and even find a way to include the other animals.

It's a story about using your talents for good whilst not changing to suit others, being wary of strangers and supporting the people who are closest to you. It can be tricky to explain to young children that people don't always have good intentions, so Mr Smarm is an excellent character for introducing this topic. Heather Pindar is great at writing fun, puntastic animal stories and we're big fans of Barbara Bakos's illustrations - her farmyard scenes are always fun to study!

If your little one loves farm animals, music or just a lot of mooing I really recommend this book!

DISCLAIMER: I received a copy of the book for the purposes of this review but all words and opinions are my own.

Linking up with #ReadWithMe hosted by Mama Mummy Mum.



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